‘American Made Matters’ Grows To Fifty Members & Sponsors The American Made Chic Bus Tour To Help Strengthen The American Dream.

‘AMERICAN MADE MATTERS’ GROWS TO FIFTY MEMBERS & SPONSORS THE AMERICAN MADE CHIC BUS TOUR TO HELP STRENGTHEN THE AMERICAN DREAM.

ADAMSTOWN, P.A. (April 18, 2012) – American Made Matters® recently welcomed WigWam Mills, Inc., Best Bath Systems, Bullhide Belts®, and Bullet Blues Custom Apparel, LLC as new members of its organization. With these companies joining the initiative, American Made Matters® has grown to fifty members and sponsors! The momentum continues to grow for American manufacturing as consumers are becoming more aware of the importance of choosing American made. American Made Matters® has a mission to educate consumers that buying US-made products strengthens the American dream and is helping consumers in finding US-made products.

American Made Matters® has also become a silver sponsor of the American Made Chic bus tour. This bus tour is being run by three American businesswomen who will travel across the country in a red, white and blue motorhome to create awareness for jobs, manufacturing and products Made in America. Stops will include the Kentucky Derby, the Country Music Festival in Nashville, Tennessee, a NASCAR event in Daytona, Florida and a final stop in Motor City in Detroit, Michigan. The tour will also include visits to manufacturing plants and promoting all things American.

American Made Matters® seeks to add member companies that manufacture in the U.S. The organization has created a common branding identity so that consumers will recognize the American Made Matters® logo and know that those products are made in the United States. Members are licensed to use the logo on products, packaging and marketing materials provided at least fifty percent of the product cost is incurred in the United States and the final transformation and assembly takes place in the States.
For more information about American Made Matters, please visit: www.AmericanMadeMatters.com.

WGSN Presents: Made in America: Tactical Marketing Message

WGSN Presents: Made in America: Tactical Marketing Message

Courtesy of WGSN.com: The New Made in America

Brands are starting to use Made in America messaging as a market differentiator. Here, we look at the tactics US retailers are using to sell the home-grown concept to the consumer.

Key Trends

  • The new spending trend centres around the luxury of made in America
  • The three key print campaigns are: American Glocalisation, Authentic Luxury and Made Well
  • Global retailers hosting local events are connecting with their customer at a more intimate, honest level, satifying the consumer’s need for authenticity
  • Strategic print and billboard campaigns, in-store events and point-of-sale collateral  are the key focus points in highlighting domestic-made goods

Takeaways

  • The Made in America marketing trend taps into a growing consumer group interested in the provenance of product
  • Provenance may not necessarily simply refer to where something is made and who made it, but also how it is made, crafted or finished, and its entire journey, from inception to store
  • The story around a product’s ingredients is just as important to the consumer as the finished item
  • A consumer interested in the provenance of product is highly researched and engaged
  • Authenticity is at the heart of a good provenance product story
  • Brands and retailers found to be inauthentic in their messaging lose consumer credibility
  • Although the US market is probably the leader in provenance-based product messaging, WGSN is tracking the trend in other markets, too, and expects to see more brands using it as a differentiator

In a market ripe with digital strategy, retailers and brands are still relying heavily on print and billboard campaigns, even utilising the age-old advertising technique of “one sentence, one sell”. We identify the three main campaign trends American Glocalisation, Authentic Luxury and Made Well.

American Glocalisation

Companies are relying on their hometown roots to connect with a global audience. This strategy works two-fold as international consumers are made aware of the authenticity of the garment and national consumers feel an intimate connection with global American brands. A prime example of this is Gap’s autumn/winter 2011/12 global print campaign. The adverts featured images from behind the scenes at the 1969 design studio in Los Angeles; the photos of Gap employees contrasted against the product shots and were stamped with a single sentence: Los Angeles, 1969.

Authentic Luxury

Brands are looking to assure the consumer that the merchandise they are purchasing is genuinely American. According to an article by American Express Open Forum, September 2011, China has a new emerging middle class who have money to spend and want to invest in higher quality goods, both domestic and foreign, and brands are looking to tap into this. True Religion’s spring/summer 2012 campaign is about The True American, while Joseph Abboud’s autumn/winter 2011/12 campaign was entitled Made In The New America. Retailers are also affirming the luxury of their brand by cross promoting nostalgia and history, such as the Brooks Brothers’ anniversary campaign, declaring “Before there was Chicago, there was Brooks Brothers”.

Made Well

Made in America campaign strategies are now less about supporting the US workers and protecting American jobs and more about the inherent American authenticity of the product, convincing the consumer it is worth paying more for a quality product and materials. Karen Kane’s autumn/winter 2011/12 collection for Dillard’s featured designers picking out fabrics, sketching and construction, while Levi’s Made Here range explores various “Curations of American craft and culture”. And American Apparel continues to promote the quality of its product through inspirational mood boards.

Big brands go local

Global brands such as New Balance, Banana Republic and Levi’s are utilising local stores to convey the Made in America message.

In San Francisco, Banana Republic and SF Made (an organisation highlighting local San Francisco designers and companies) teamed up in February for a pop-up shop inside Banana Republic’s Grant Avenue flagship store. Shoppers perused and purchased items from Hilside Bags, Heliotrope, Ellie + Billie and Blue Blood. The partnership was so successful that an SF Made directory has been added to the Banana Republic website, making featured companies’ products available for purchase.

Levi’s and New Balance chose personalised and strategic in-store events to introduce the public to new merchandise and messaging, emphasising the quality and luxury of the goods in the invitations and the in-store signage. This strategy is being utilised by some of America’s mega malls including Watters Creek in Texas and The Block at Orange in Orange County, California. Both malls held Made in the USA-themed shopping days where the campaign tagline was “luxury is local”.

Confirming the trend in-store

The most popular messaging practice is through point-of-sale collateral, namely in-store signage, swing-tags and labels. Gap stores throughout the US display “Designed in Los Angeles” signage, complete with the design studio address, while Club Monaco and Madewell store displays highlight local luxury goods merchandise. In October 2011, Club Monaco debuted the Made in the USA collection; a “carefully curated collection” of men’s apparel and accessories – every product featured a Made in the USA label and swing-tag.

While consumers are drawn in by American luxury, the various stopovers in the form of collaterals – from in-store signage and store bags to hang-tags and labels – keeps them connected to the authentic and glocalised feeling that they get from their purchase.

Charlie Pomykal, director of sales and marketing for Santiago Knits, said: “We really wanted to stress to our customer that they are purchasing a luxury product, hand loomed in Los Angeles. They may only be in a store for a few minutes and they’ll likely throw away the bag as soon as they get home, so the label was key – the label stays as long as the garment.”

Made in America goes viral

Brands are using their digital platforms to highlight and reinforce the Made in the USA messaging, reassuring consumers of the quality of the product. Websites for Brooks Brothers, Lands’ End and Ernest Alexander pinpoint direct apparel sources, letting the consumer know where the materials are virtually born and raised.

Unlike the print campaigns that generally use the “one sentence, one sell” strategy, the digital platforms are highly in-depth, taking the customer from company inception to iconic pieces, such as Levi’s 501 Original jeans and Brooks Brothers’ ties.

Kelley’s Men Shop Unveils Loggerhead Apparel

Kelley’s Men Shop Unveils Loggerhead Apparel

Kelley’s Men’s shop unveils Loggerhead apparel at it’s Charleston, WV store.

The company’s signature product, the Bellwether Polo, is constructed of 100% American grown Pima Cotton. Loggerhead donates 10% of all its revenue to regional Sea Turtle Conservation efforts. It already has surpassed $10,000 in donations in it’s first year of business. To view the video, click here!

CRESCENT Products: Loggerhead Apparel — A South Carolina Brand Built on State Pride

CRESCENT Products: Loggerhead Apparel — A South Carolina Brand Built on State Pride

You’re working for one of the biggest advertising firms in South Carolina. You meet the love of your life. You get married. You start a new company and work to grow it while you’re expecting your first child. That’s the story of Sara and Zac Painter.

Inspired by Men’s Health magazine’s “Eat This, Not That,” a segment designed to show how to swap high fat food for lower calorie alternatives that don’t sacrifice flavor, Sara and Zac decided to apply that thought to South Carolina. What brands could they exchange for South Carolina-made alternatives?

Well, when they realized there were no clothing brands made in the Palmetto State, Sara and Zac decided to change that.

Like Zac told CRESCENT, “You know, the history of South Carolina in textiles, in agriculture, there is no reason not to do it.”

They pounded the pavement, connected the right vendors, and brought Loggerhead Apparel and itsBellweather Polo to upscale clothing retailers across the Southeast.

Did we mention that they also take 10% off the top to donate to Loggerhead Sea Turtle conservation efforts?

You’re very blatant about saying “Made in the United States” and showcasing that you make as much of Loggerhead’s products in South Carolina as you can.

ZAC: Yeah, and not everything we do is made in South Carolina.  The product we launched with Bellwether Polo is, and it’s on the label, “Made in South Carolina, USA,” a big point of pride for us to be able to have that on the label — because to be on the label, it has to be made here.

SARA: And that comes from our heritage.  We’re both from South Carolina.  I’m from the coast, he’s from the Upstate. Kind of the combination of textile industry and Spartanburg that used to be known as “Textile Town.”  I’m from the coast and have been involved in Loggerhead sea turtle conservation, so that was where that sort of came together and why we wanted to launch our first product that was made in South Carolina.  But knowing that we wouldn’t always be able to do everything in South Carolina.

ZAC: “Made in the USA” is huge.  Speed of doing business is really good.  As far as the benefits outside of the force impacting the local economy and keeping that rolling and employing Americans, the cool thing about it is our polo manufacturer is a 2 ½ hour drive from here (Greenville), so literally, when our shirts are done, a truck picks them up and they’re here the next morning.  There’s not a 3-month wait as it crosses the Pacific on a freighter.

The yarn arrives in South Carolina in Jefferson — sort of southeast of Charlotte in Chesterfield County.  It arrives there then it’s dyed in Gaffney.  It’s finished in Lamar.  It’s embroidered in Mauldin.  The labels are made in Spartanburg.  But all of that happens here, in South Carolina which is pretty cool.

That’s part of the myth that we wanted to bust.  You can do all of those things here in state.  You may have to look a little harder to find them, but all of these companies, everything that I just mentioned.  There’s a place in Gaffney that’s dyeing 6000 pounds of our fabric.  We actually use a trucking company that’s here.  That ships them back and forth.  All of these things, you can do here, you just have to find them. It was a lot of hard work.  That was one of the hardest things, finding all of those companies in South Carolina, but what we get is an incredibly fast production process for what we’re doing.

Because, again, when they’re going from the dye house to the manufacturer, it’s a 2 hour ride on the back of a truck.  It’s not on a train then on a truck then on a boat then on a train and then on a truck.  So that’s a really cool part of it and being able to pick up the phone and be on the same time zone.  Not have to worry about international calls …

The whole thing was kind of paralleling the Loggerhead. The Loggerhead is in danger and a lot of US manufacturing is in danger, too, especially in South Carolina.  We have one of the highest unemployments in the country, so we keep as much of it here as we can.

What kind of process did y’all have to go through, though.  Because you get this idea in your head, what kind of process did you have to go through to figure out how to get all these suppliers and vendors that close together.  You said you had to look but, good grief, in South Carolina, you’d really have to look.

ZAC: Right.  Not a lot of people know this, but, as far as our polo shirts, the plant where they’re made, they actually used to make Ralph Lauren polos in South Carolina prior to some of the trade agreements that made it so easy for companies to move manufacturing overseas.  So the same plant that our shirts are coming out of, Ralph Lauren shirts used to roll out of…

SARA: Same people that worked to manufacture ours.

ZAC: The guy that supplies our yarn used to supply yarn for Tommy Hilfiger, Ralph Lauren, they worked with Lacoste in the past.  So we’ve got the talent here.  And that’s one of the things that’s made it. Once we found them, they had the equipment, the knowledge, the experience to do it.  We just had to find them and make the connection.

SARA: And another really important thing is they had the passion for what we were passionate about in wanting to do it here.  They’ve had so many companies pull their business overseas, so they really appreciate what we’re doing and have really become a partner of ours.

It’s almost becoming a life blood of some of the smaller towns.  If you look over at what happened in Liberty with the denim plant and the town doing everything they can to try and find a new investor and not being successful.  That’s a major part of their population that’s now going to be wondering where their check’s coming from.

ZAC: If you look on our web site, when we were first writing sort of our story that we could give to some of the vendors and say, “Look. Here’s what we’re trying to do.”  There was a comment in there about “What you just mentioned, we compare it to what’s happened to Detroit and what’s happened in parts of Eastern North Carolina with the furniture industry.”  It’s killed whole areas. That’s crazy, and that’s what’s happened in South Carolina in some of those cases.

A lot of those mills have shut down, most of the textiles you see now are high end condos, which is good that they’re using them for something, but it’s also really sad since that was the life blood of the community.  The house that I was born in was in a mill village.  I could see the mill from my front porch.  I could hear the whistle every morning.  My grandparents lived on the same street and walked to work.  It was…it’s sad to see all those go so far down or just go away completely.

The guys that we work with in Lamar are a fifth of the size they once were.  They have some people who don’t work 5 days a week because there’s not 5 days’ worth of work to do.  We said very early on, that’s…that was one of the reasons we wanted to this.  I’d love for that guy to be able to work 5 days a week this year and help get them back up. We’re not going to do it on our own, obviously.  It requires more volume that we do right now to truly impact the plant to where they can hire additional people and put those extra hours out there, but that’s what we want to do.

From regulatory standpoint, how much of a headache has it been?  Because when you’re putting people to work, there’s a lot of headache now that seems to go along with it.  What kind of agreements have you had to work with and go through to make life as easy as possible on yourselves?

ZAC: You know, it’s funny, we were talking earlier about establishing trust with some of these folks. I think our story, they had passion for it.  They believed in what we were trying to do and we, right or wrong, probably skipped over a lot of that stuff because it was sort of that “old school, man of my word, I’m going to shake your hand and this is what we’re going to do” kind of thing.

So we haven’t had a lot of headaches, as far as that goes.  We’ve done a lot of that stuff retroactively with agreements, but literally, the first shipments of shirts we had…we had an invoice when the truck arrived with several thousand shirts and we’d never paid a dime to those guys, but they trusted us.  They could sense our passion.  That knew that we were willing to come through on this. They wanted to do it. A lot of our vendors and people who are working for us feel like a part of the company because they’ve been gung-ho for us and pulling for us all along.  The guy that supplies our yarn, every single time I talk to him, he asks how the baby’s doing and how Sara’s doing.  He’s offered. “When the baby comes, I know it’s going to be a hectic couple of weeks for you.  Anything I can do…”  He’s volunteering his family members to help us out.  We’ve got vendors like that. It’s a lot easier to do business with people like that than when you have to have this form completed to do X work.  You have to have this…this deadline, prepay this, percentage of this.

There is a lot of that.

ZAC: There is a lot of that. Luckily, we’ve been able to skip over some of that.  Now, as we get bigger, I’m sure that may not be as possible, but I don’t know.  There very well could. We’re talking about ordering thousands of dollars worth of yarn, all he needs from me is for me to say, “Yeah,” on the phone, and he’s done.  That’s pretty amazing, the trust level that’s there.  Especially in my experience how much paperwork and compliance and legal documents and contracts that you have to go through.  We really haven’t had to do that.

SARA: And I’d say the bigger, the company that we work with, the more likely they are to need credit information up front.  The smaller the company, the more they’re willing to do it on our relationship.

ZAC: We’ve got 20 vendors out there.  How many credit applications have we done?  I don’t think we’ve done a single one.  It’s all been through a network.

That’s almost unheard of.

ZAC: It is, but it’s been really cool.  I called an organization in Columbia that works with clothing manufacturers, fabrics, that sort of stuff so. I called them and told them what I was trying to do.  They said, “Yeah, call this person in Jefferson, South Carolina.  He’s a good guy for you.”  I called him. We started chatting about what we wanted to do.  He could tell, I’m sure, that I didn’t know exactly the lingo to use.  He’s like, “This is a really cool idea.  How serious are you about it?”  I said, “Well look, I’m very serious.  Give me your email address, and let me send you some stuff that we put together. We talked about our mission, our commitment, and our background.”  He basically made the comment and said, “I’ve helped other startups before who have either faded or quickly left me to go somewhere else or moved their stuff overseas.”  I remember telling him, “We can’t do that because our brand is based on it.  If we were to do that, we’d have to start another company.  It wouldn’t be this company.”  And I remember that was the turning point of the conversation because after that, it was like, “Alright, I’m in.  I’ll get some samples over to you.  Let’s start talking about what we want to do.”

We worked together for, I think, 6 months before I wrote him the first check and he’s already done thousands of dollars of work for us.  And then he said, “OK, I’m going to put you in touch with this person because he’s who you need to work with.”  His guys we worked with developing the patterns and getting the fit right and all of this kind of stuff. We talked to a different embroiderer.  He set up an account with the dye house in Gaffney, with the yarn suppliers, with the Pima guys in Arizona, and all this happened, literally, the first time we wrote a check for more than a couple of thousand dollars, we had already completed thousands of shirts.  All on just a handshake, basically.  That old mentality of doing things which is…

The way things used to be done.

ZAC: It’s amazing, looking back, that we were able to do that and things are moving so quickly. When you do it, you don’t think about it, but looking back on it, it is pretty cool to think how all these guys just believed in it and wanted to be a part of it.  They thought it was a good idea and then they put their necks out for it, too.

SARA: And I think because we’re working with local vendors that all know each other, we’re benefiting from this wide network of resources that we wouldn’t have gotten if we were working with a much bigger group overseas…

And they’ve already built their network of trust.

SARA: Exactly.  Yeah.  So we feel good about all these moving pieces and parts because of that network of trust.

ZAC: Yeah, I trust everyone he’s sending me to and, by default, they trust me.

Stay tuned for Part 2.

Capps in Gretna lands military contract, keeping workers busy.

Capps Shoe Company, Inc., has been awarded a new four year contract from the U.S. Department of Defense for $27,815,205, to produce the men’s dress oxford for both the U.S. Army, and the U.S. Marine Corps. (Steven Mantilla/Work It, SoVa)

BY TARA BOZICK
Work It, SoVa

GRETNA — Workers in Gretna are busy making men’s oxford dress shoes for the U.S. Army and Marine Corps now that Capps Shoe Company Inc. landed a contract for up to $27.8 million with the U.S. Department of Defense’s logistics support agency.

“Oh, it’s great news,” said plant manager Tim Huffman.

A week ago, the Defense Logistics Agency awarded the contract with a one-year base term of $6.7 million. If all three one-year additional options are exercised, then the total would be $27.8 million, said DLA public affairs specialist Tonya Johnson.

Huffman said this would keep the Lynchburg-based company’s 160 employees — 145 in Gretna Industrial Park — working for another four years.

Capps also makes women’s oxford dress shoes for the Army, Navy and Air Force on a five-year contract awarded in 2010 that brought employees back to work after temporary layoffs. Receiving the men’s contract in time prevented more temporary layoffs.

Now, employees are busy cranking out more than 1,600 shoes a day for the military while also filling private orders. Factory equipment buzzes as shoes make it down the assembly line. The insoles bear the “Capps” name and declare “Made in U.S.A.”

“I love it,” said 35-year-old Herman Witcher of Gretna. “ … It’s kind of fun making them.”
Witcher, who worked the staple side lasting machine Wednesday, feels glad to provide shoes for the military.

“They’re helping me out, too — keeping me in work,” the employee of four years said.

Deborah Moore of Gretna, who’s worked at the facility for 14 years, said contracts mean job security.

“It helps us all have a job,” Moore said. “We were worried about not having one if we didn’t get a contract. It helps everyone.”

Yet, Capps, which owns the Johansen brand, is finding ways to supplement its contracted business through Internet sales and new product development, Huffman said.

When customers purchase shoes online for direct shipment, the Gretna team makes them to order. Capps has the ability to digitize shoe patterns and send data to an automated cutting machine. The computer-aided design room also helps Capps develop its own products or make prototypes for its partners.

“This will help develop new business for the future,” Huffman said.

Capps has owned the Gretna facility since 1997. For more information, visit www.usmadeshoes.com.

K’NEX® Celebrating 20 years of American Made Toys!

K’NEX® Celebrating 20 years of American Made Toys!
2012 Product Line Will Be Shown at NY Toy Fair

Hatfield, Pa. (February, 2012) – K’NEX, the construction toy company focused on Building Worlds Kids Love™, will be celebrating 20 years of American Made toys with retailers and fans alike at the Javits Convention Center in New York during American International Toy Fair®, being held February 12th through the 15th.

“Celebrating our 20th year by sharing our new product line with the media and our valued retail partners is exciting,” said Michael Araten, President and CEO of K’NEX and The Rodon Group. “K’NEX is proud to be able to offer consumers high-quality toys at a reasonable cost—90% of which are made right here in the USA.”

Founded in 1992, K’NEX maintains its commitment to continued manufacturing in the United States. At a time when most toys are made overseas, K’NEX has become America’s Building Toy Company–over 90% of its parts are manufactured by its sister company, The Rodon Group. The Rodon Group has been in business since 1956, and is an eco-friendly manufacturing facility in Hatfield, PA that has manufactured over 30 billion parts for K’NEX over the past twenty years.

Products being shown in the K’NEX booth (#5279) at NY Toy Fair are developed for children ages 2-12 and include the highly anticipated Angry Birds®-licensed K’NEX building sets in addition to new product launches from K’NEX, KID K’NEX®, K’NEX Classics, Sesame Street®, NASCAR®, Monster Jam®, Tinker Toy®, and  Mario Kart Wii®-licensed K’NEX building sets.

For more information please stop by our booth at Toy Fair – booth #5279,

or contact Kate Loffio at kloffio@knex.com for a copy of our digital press kit.

MEDIA INQUIRIES WELCOME

About K’NEX Brands

Founded in 1992, K’NEX Brands, the world’s most innovative construction toy company, was established to make and sell what has become one of the world’s leading integrated construction systems for children. Winner of over 200 international awards and recognitions, K’NEX is America’s building toy company focused on Building Worlds Kids Love, and encourages youngsters to “imagine, build and play.”  For more information, please visit www.knex.com.

About The Rodon Group

The Rodon Group is an ISO 9001-2008 certified plastic injection molder.  In business since 1956, the Rodon Group makes billions of parts each year in its 125,000 square foot facility.  With over 106 injection molding presses, Rodon is one of the largest family-owned and operated injection molders in the United States.  The Rodon Group serves a diverse group of industries including consumer products, medical, construction, pharmaceutical and toys.  Since 1992, Rodon has manufactured over 30 billion parts for the K’NEX building toy system, and is a subsidiary of K’NEX Brands, L.P.  For more information please visit www.rodongroup.com.

 

K’NEX® Featured in “Made Right Here” Segment on WFMZ Evening News

K’NEX® Featured in “Made Right Here” Segment on WFMZ Evening News

Segment Aired January 16, Can Also be Viewed on KNEX.com

Hatfield, Pa. (January, 2012) – K’NEX, the construction toy company focused on Building Worlds Kids Love™, was featured in a “Made Right Here” segment that aired during the 6pm edition of the WFMZ evening news on January 16, 2012. The “Made Right Here” segment features companies manufacturing product in eastern Pennsylvania.

“We couldn’t be happier that WFMZ has decided to include K’NEX in their “Made Right Here” series,” said Michael Araten. President and CEO of K’NEX and The Rodon Group. “We are proud to manufacture in nearby Hatfield and honored to be included.”

The Made Right Here segment includes footage shot in Hatfield, Pennsylvania at both K’NEX and The Rodon Company’s headquarters this past fall.  WFMZ has profiled 12 local companies in their Made Right Here series since it began airing in 2009. Check out the www.knex.com homepage to watch the entire K’NEX Made Right Here segment.

Founded in 1992, K’NEX is pleased to celebrate its 20th anniversary in 2012 and maintains its commitment to continued manufacturing in the United States. At a time when most toys are made overseas, K’NEX has become America’s Building Toy Company–over 90% of its parts are manufactured by its sister company, The Rodon Group. The Rodon Group has been in business since 1956 and is an eco-friendly manufacturing facility in Hatfield, PA. that has manufactured over 30 billion parts for K’NEX.

 

About K’NEX Brands

Founded in 1992, K’NEX Brands, the world’s most innovative construction toy company, was established to make and sell what has become one of the world’s leading integrated construction systems for children. Winner of over 200 international awards and recognitions, K’NEX is America’s building toy company focused on Building Worlds Kids Love, and encourages youngsters to “imagine, build and play.”  For more information, please visit www.knex.com.

About The Rodon Group

The Rodon Group is an ISO 9001-2008 certified plastic injection molder.  In business since 1956, the Rodon Group makes billions of parts each year in its 125,000 square foot facility.  With over 106 injection molding presses, Rodon is one of the largest family-owned and operated injection molders in the United States.  The Rodon Group serves a diverse group of industries including consumer products, medical, construction, pharmaceutical and toys.  Since 1992, Rodon has manufactured over 30 billion parts for the K’NEX building toy system, and is a subsidiary of K’NEX Brands, L.P.  For more information please visit www.rodongroup.com.

Boston’s Ball and Buck Announces 17.9% Average Monthly Sales Growth for its American Made Products

Boston’s Made in USA Menswear Retail Brand Ball and Buck Announces 17.9% Average Monthly Sales Growth for its American Made Products.

Demand for American – Made Products on the rise: Boston’s award winning Made in USA store reports average monthly sales growth of 17.9%. Ball and Buck, a clothing Brand focused on producing and selling products that use only the highest quality materials and craftsmanship takes it one step further by committing to make everything it sells in the USA. This decision, part of a growing trend in conscious consumerism, helps to reduce the long-term impact on both the environment and consumers wallets as they have products that far outlast the majority of other imported products on the market today. On top of that, the boutique was named Boston’s number one menswear retailer by Boston.com in June.

Ball and Buck Made in USA Boston, MA

Ball and Buck Made in USA Boston, MA

Quote startThe Ball and Buck brand is built on the premise of conscious consumerism. By offering only high quality products, consumers own more durable goods, which results in less consumption and far less waste.Quote end

Boston, MA (PRWEB) December 14, 2011

For Boston’s award-winning Boston based retailerBall and Buck, the sluggish economic climate has failed to dampen its rapid growth. Despite opening less than a year ago, the Made in USA menswear shop and its accompanying online store has reported an average monthly sales growth of 17.9% – a statistic that is projected to increase in the coming year.

Ball and Buck is the first of its kind – a retailer that prides itself in producing and selling clothing and accessories that are made exclusively in the USA. With over forty made in USA brands, including its own line of made in USA clothing and accessories, Ball and Buck enables customers to support American jobs by purchasing high quality clothing and accessories that come with a lifetime satisfaction guarantee.

Mark Bollman, Ball and Buck’s president and founder, believes the store’s immediate success has much to do with shoppers’ desires to reduce their consumption on cheap import products that need frequent replacing and instead purchase high quality, domestically-made products that last considerably longer and support American Jobs at the same time. For a small business such as Ball and Buck, the extraordinary reception of its proprietary product line is clearly indicative of the brand’s future growth potential.

“The Ball and Buck brand is built on the premise of conscious consumerism. By offering only high quality products, consumers own more durable goods, which results in less consumption and far less waste. What’s even better is that all our products actually get better with wear, which can’t be said for many things in the market today,” Bollman says.

From made in USA jeans to Ball and Buck’s own line of pocket tees to Caswell-Massey’s line of colognes worn by past presidents, the store’s 100% American-made clothing and other products are clearly grabbing customers’ attention – the boutique was named Boston’s number one menswear retailer by Boston.com in June.

About Ball and Buck:

Ball and Buck is a one of a kind all-American clothing brand and retailer – everything produced and sold in store and online is made exclusively in the USA. Through emphasizing the value of American quality over foreign quantity, Ball and Buck supports American jobs and provides its customers with pridefully crafted, high quality clothing and products with a lifetime satisfaction guarantee.

Press Contacts:
Alia Gilbert
617 742 1776
agilbert(at)ballandbuck(dot)com

Lindley Wren
617 742 1776
lwren(at)ballandbuck(dot)com

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